The Golf Ball and How Nike Missed The Boat

Leading up to the 2000 US Open tournament, virtually all the golf balls in use, especially by professionals, were of wound construction.  Top of the line balls had balata covers which better golfers beat to shreds.  Tour pros routinely used six balls per round.  The exception was a Titleist ball with an Elastomer cover, the Titleist Professional, which closely resembled the Tour Balata, but with a more resilient cover.

At the beginning of the 2000 season, Tiger Woods, who was a Nike athlete was using the Titleist Professional ball.  Nike in partnership with Bridgestone Golf was prototyping a ball called the Nike Tour Accuracy, which Tiger call “My Ball”, planned for release at the beginning of the 2001 PGA Tour season.  In early 2000 Tiger had narrowed the prototype field down to two versions.  After some additional testing, the final version of the ball was brought to Hamburg for testing during practice rounds at the 2000 Deutsche Bank-SAP Open.  In a wind-swept heavy rain, Tiger hit a drive from the first tee with the Titleist Professional ball that the wind caught and push into the rough.  Tiger next hit the Nike prototype on the same starting line. The Nike ball moved about five yards in the wind and stopped in the middle of the fairway.  In May 2000, Tiger switched to the Nike ball, ahead of the original schedule.  Starting with the 2000 US Open, Tiger won his “Tiger Slam” with “My Ball” and changed the golf ball industry in the process.

What does this have to do with business?  During that period, Tiger Woods was the most influential golfer in the world.  That influence resulted in a complete move away from wound golf balls to the new two- and three-piece balls.  To quote Tiger;

“I won four majors with that ball, and the rest is history because wound-ball technology is gone.  Everyone switched.”

Unfortunately, Nike was totally unprepared to capitalize on Tiger’s success using the Nike Tour Accuracy golf ball.  Kel Devlin, Nike’s global director of sports marketing still ponders the circumstances around the ball.

“If we had enough capacity, and I could have gotten the sports marketing folks and Phil [Knight] to buy into the bigger program … if we’d had the ball available to any Tour player who wanted it four weeks earlier than we did …”

Result?  Nike is no longer in the golf ball business and Titleist continues as the far and away best-selling brand of golf balls.

So, I ask you the same question I ask of most of my clients when they are about to begin a new strategy or marketing program,

“What if this works?”

When you do something new, do you prepare for success?  If you are launching a new product or item, do you arrange for timely delivery of inventory on a just-in-time basis?  If you are launching a new service, has your team been fully trained to consistently deliver the service up to the quality you require, while continuing to support (not losing) your existing loyal clients?  To successfully scale your business, it is essential to ask these questions and many more as part of your planning and implementation process.

My ActionCOACH colleagues and I are expert at assisting clients just like you in the development of new products and services and business growth.

*Based on an article in the June 2019 edition of Golf Magazine.

2019 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of the Obvious – Part 1

For the fourth year in a row, the Business Excellence Forum (BEF) grew and exceeded the previous years in attendance, presenters and content.  This year there were more than 700 business owners, executives, team members and business coaches in attendance in Charleston, SC.  With that many attendees, there was an abundance of formal and informal exchanges of ideas, strategies, success stories and best practices. This year’s forum had an extensive list of keynote speakers whose presentations yielded many Blinding Flashes of the Obvious (BFOs) and new ways of looking at things.  The following are some of the BFOs that struck a chord with me, all of which will enhance the value I bring to my clients.  I am sure that some of these will have a similar effect on you. The event began with Dr. Mark Thompson and Dr. Bonita Thompson, authors of “Admired – 21 Ways to Double Your Value”.  Their presentation was about “Being The Most Admired Brand.”   They presented the five factors needed to be an admired brand:
  1. Who do you admire?
    • We admire people with the same values as us
    • We all need “Power Partners” – mentors
  2. Productive PARANOIA
    • Steve Jobs 1.0 – was fired from Apple. At that time, he was ambitious, arrogant, and lacked humility
    • Steve Jobs 2.0 – re-tooled himself and built Apple into one of the most valuable companies in the world
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  1. Value-Creators – If your house burned down, would you:
    • Rebuild the same House?
    • Using the same Process?
    • With the same Team?
    • What about your business? Does your business create Value?
  2. Never-ending Mission – four parts
    • BHAGs – Big Hairy Audacious Goals
    • OKR – Objectives and Key Results
    • Simplicity
    • Urgency – Creates Learning & Growth
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  1. Deliberate Practice – 6 Parts
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  1. Redefine Success – What is your definition of Success?
img_2846-for-blog They concluded with the secret to passionate growth: img_2849-for-blog And Number 7 Gratitude. Our next speaker was ActionCOACH Chairman and Founder, Brad Sugars.  Under the often-repeated mantra of going back to basics, Brad presented some reminders and updates to the Six Steps to Massive Results seminar.  Highlights include:
  • Don’t fall in love with your product or service – break out of your rut and continually improve and innovate
  • It is no use building your marketing if you can’t keep the customers – make sure you can consistently deliver
  • With the internet and social media, marketing has shifted toward labor, away from spend
  • In the ActionCOACH concept of Test & Measure – testing has become extremely easy because of all the statistics that are available
  • Use the ActionCOACH 5 Way Formula backwards, from Profit up – 5 years, 4 years, …
Stay tuned for the next installment of BFOs from the 2019 BEF.

You Can’t Do It All

The cover story in the current (January-February 2019) edition of Entrepreneur Magazine is a profile of Michael Strahan (Link to the article).  Not being a daytime TV viewer, or a NY Giants fan, I was not very familiar with him.  Until I read the article, I was almost totally unaware of Michael Strahan’s many accomplishments after retiring from the National Football League.  There are a few things we can learn from his business career after his playing days were behind him. It Is What It Is Until It Isn’t – Not unlike many pro athletes, Strahan had no plan what he would do once the game ended for him.  Nonetheless, he piled up an impressive playing record; fifteen seasons (the average NFL playing career is only 3 years).  That level of longevity speaks to a dedication to be the best defensive end he could be.  He gave his all to his football career until it was over.  Are you totally engaged in your business? Deal With Pressure – After the NFL, Strahan went into sportscasting.  Leaving football introduced the concern and possibility the he would “suck” (his word) at something.  “You don’t want to be the weak link.” He said.  He realized that facing a 350-pound opponent who was trying to smash his head in was more pressure than “shaking a dude’s hand and asking him a few questions.”  He put the pressure of a new role into perspective.  Are you putting the day-to-day pressure you face in your business into perspective? Build Your Team – Along the way, Strahan, influenced by his career in professional football, a team sport, assembled a very effective team.  As he said in the article:

“I understand that it’s a bigger team than just you on the camera.  The most important people are the ones behind the camera.”  He went on to say, “You understand how important the support system is in sports, and that has carried over to me in business.  Because there’s nothing worse than feeling that you do a job no one values.  Each job is important – I don’t care if you’re cleaning out the garbage cans or working the phones or running the company.  Everybody has value, and football taught me to make people feel that value to get the best out of them.” (emphasis added)

Great insight toward building an effective TEAM. If you want to build a highly effective team for your business, a team that will enable you, your business and the team itself to bring amazing value to your customers and community, my ActionCOACH colleagues and I are ready to help.  All you must do is pick up the phone, tablet or keyboard and contact an ActionCOACH business coach.

Stress Test Your Business

One of the most important concepts my colleagues and I at ActionCOACH coach our clients on is being proactive.  Everything from our GrowthCLUB (90 Day Planning Workshop), our use of the ActionCOACH Business Chassis (5 Way Formula), to the alignment consultation we use to start each of our client’s coaching programs, is aimed at promoting proactivity.  Unfortunately, too many of the businesses I am introduced to operate on a reactive basis, reacting on a daily, sometimes hourly, rhythm of solving crisis after crisis after crisis.  The consequences of operating in reactive mode are many; lack of growth, low company morale, low or no profit, high levels of stress, and in some cases, bankruptcy! Chief among the steps toward proactivity is to periodically Stress Test your business.  Here are a few of the tests you must perform:
TEST Explanation
What if this works? “What if this works?” is one of my best coaching questions.  You cannot achieve continuing success without preparing for it.  This doesn’t mean starting a second shift before your sales increase, for example.  It does mean having the plans and processes for starting a second shift prepared as part of introducing your new product.
What if a key part of your business goes down? Machinery breakdowns, illness of key team members, storms, key team retirement or resignations, etc. are a fact of business life.  How much cross training and employee development is part of your daily routine?  How many strategic alliances have you developed?  Do you have succession plans?  Being prepared is a major responsibility of business ownership and leadership.
What is my customer retention? Low customer retention, and/or a low customer referral rate are leading KPIs, indicating a need to proactively redesign your operations.  Simply, if you are not at minimum, satisfying your customers, you have a big problem.  Of course, your goal should be to consistently WOW your customers.  Customers who are only satisfied are not loyal, raving fan customers.
  The results of these stress tests and others, whether good or bad, should lead you to proactive activities.  My colleagues and I at ActionCOACH are ready to assist you to stress test your business and to implement proactive processes.  All you need to do to start your proactive journey is contact us.  

Work on your business, not just in your business.

Some Thoughts About Direct to Consumer Startups

I just finished reading a very insightful article entitled The Race To Reinvent Everything by Tom Foster in the May 2018 edition of INC Magazine.  The article is about direct-to-consumer (DTC) startups, companies that are emulating the Warby-Parker model for many other product categories.  Products currently offered by more than 400 DTC startups range from bras to tampons.  While the article made many interesting points about the challenges and opportunities these startups are faced with, two points resonated with me.
  1. Not All Products Offer the Same Opportunities – Warby-Parker has been extremely successful due to two main factors:
    1. They offer superior value to their customers. Warby is selling a formerly $500.00 item for less than $100.00
    2. This value proposition enabled their customers to own many pairs of glasses, converting a category that was a necessity into a fashion category

The article went on to compare several other products where either the value proposition is not strong enough (sofas), the category is flooded with many DTC startups (Razors), or the major players in the marketplace have the technical resources to jump into the category on a DTC basis in addition to their customary channels of distribution (Razors again).  If you are considering starting a DTC company, you must carefully consider your proposed value proposition along with product costs, including sales and marketing.  Further, this article is a strong primer on the DTC landscape.

  1. Key Performance Indicators – DTC vs. Bricks and Mortar – The article mentioned some major differences between DTC and traditional retail’s ability to collect actionable KPI’s, giving the advantage to DTC. Specifically, DTC companies can capture essential KPI’s, such as customer acquisition cost, number of leads by source or campaign, and conversion rate by source or campaign more rapidly and accurately than traditional retailers.  Customer lifetime value is another very important KPI which is just as hard to predict for DTC startups as it is for traditional retailers.  However, DTC companies can have statistically valid lifetime value data sooner than traditional retailers.  The increased accuracy and timeliness of KPI’s allows DTC startups to finetune their model as early as possible.  Traditional brick and mortar retailers are faced with the need to collect these same KPI’s.  However, it can be more difficult, be less accurate and take more time for traditional retailers.  The section of the article where this is presented is a good summary of Buying Customers a book by Brad Sugars, Founder and Chairman of ActionCOACH.
Whether you are starting a direct-to-consumer or traditional retailer, you should read this article to achieve a strategic advantage over other potential startups in your planned market space.  The article contains lots of additional information you will need BEFORE you get too far on your startup journey.  My colleagues and I at ActionCOACH can further assist you in sorting out your options and planning your success.

It (Almost) Never Fails

While flossing my teeth this morning I recalled my late mother’s expression “It never fails.”  I decided to write this blog about my top three list of things that never fail, well almost never fail. Of course, top of mind and number one on the list:
  1. The last piece of dental floss in the container is too short to be useable – Unless you are a dental floss savant, this “never fails” is based on pure luck.
The second “never fails” applies to most amateur golfers:
  1. A golf ball that strikes a tree on either side of a fairway will (almost) always bounce away from that fairway – While this “never fails” has an element of luck associated with it, a golfer could improve their odds by being coached and taking lessons with a PGA professional. As their ability to hit a golf ball where they aim increases, they will reduce the number of trees hit.  By the way, a great golf KPI is number of fairways hit.
Number three on the list of “never fails” is about, unfortunately, most business owners and their businesses:
  1. A business owner without written plans will fail to reach their business and personal goals – My colleagues at ActionCOACH and I have witnessed too many businesses that have grown organically, without plans. Before I joined ActionCOACH I had several turn-around engagements.  Every company I worked to rescue exhibited a lack of planning.  The effect of lack of planning was a major reason they arrived in a turn-around situation.
Our ActionCOACH clients benefit from our planning culture.  All my clients have some, if not all of the following plans:
  • 90 Day working on the business plans
  • Classical business plans with budgets, cashflow, revenue and expense projections
  • 1, 3 and 5-year Organization Charts
  • Hiring plans with trigger benchmarks
  • Marketing plans
  • And others
As the expression goes; “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” The benefits of planning are numerous:
  • Plans, especially written plans, have a very high correlation with success.
  • Plans are essential if you have a team. They communicate your goals and engage your team toward goal achievement.  Simply put, plans help you, and your entire team get leverage of skills, knowledge and time.
  • Plans inoculate your business against failure. While there are no guarantees, planning certainly stacks the desk in your favor.
  • The process of producing and maintaining your plans is just as important as the actual plans. It is a major part of your responsibility as a business owner to create a success environment for you and your team.
  • And many more.
If your business is not about to require a rescue, it is not too late to become a proactive, planning high-achieving business owner with an exceptional business.  The choice is up to you, don’t plan to fail! Should you choose not to plan to fail, my colleagues and I at ActionCOACH will be happy to assist you on your path to business success.  Simply contact me or your local ActionCOACH. Finally, please let me know what some of your top “never fails” are in your comments to this blog.

2018 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of the Obvious Part 2

While reviewing my notes for this blog, I noticed that I omitted two Elizabeth McCormick BFOs from Part 1
  • When thingsimg_1523-for-blog get hard, ask yourself “Do I Want This?”
  • CAN
    • Communicate – Positive & Proactive
    • Aviate – Take Action
    • Navigate – Clarity
  Elizabeth McCormick was followed by Chris Voss, CEO of The Black Swan Group, LTD and co-author of Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It.  He spent 24 years working in the FBI Crisis Negotiation Unit and was the FBI’s chief international hostage and kidnapping negotiator from 2003 to 2007.  There were only a few BFOs from Mr. Voss, however they were MAJOR.  During negotiations:
  • Banish “I Understand” from your vocabulary. It is condescending.
  • Build confidence & trustworthiness – “Will you listen to what I have to say?”
  • Open by asking a question or making a statement with the expected answer or response of NO. For example: “It looks like there is no way to get the hostages released safely.”  Going for the NO gets the other side to tell you what they are really after.  Chris gave several sales-oriented examples: “It looks like you are not interested saving money for payroll processing while getting quicker service.”
  • Never say “you’re right” only say “That’s right” and then shut up!
  • Perceived EMPATHY is a Truth Serum
Our next speaker was Dr. Tony Alessandra, CEO of Assessments 24×7, LLC.  Dr. Alessandra is a prolific author with 30 books translated into over 50 foreign language editions, including the newly revised, best-selling The NEW Art of Managing PeopleCharismaThe Platinum RuleCollaborative Selling; and Communicating at Work.  ActionCOACH has a strategic partnership with Assessments 24×7 that enables my colleagues and I to offer a variety of online assessments, including the widely used DISC profile, the Hartman HVPMotivators (Values/PIAV) assessment, and several 360º effectiveness assessments.  BFOs from Dr. Alessandra include:
  • “Prescription before diagnosis is malpractice.” This represents a prime reason we at ActionCOACH offer a complementary diagnostic coaching session before suggesting a coaching program to prospective clients.
  • Establishing a competitive advantage is founded on an understanding of customer needs (not wants) and the ability of competitors to meet those needs. Understanding your competitive advantage allows you to sell value, not price.
    • Understand your Uniqueness’s, Advantages & Disadvantages
    • To dig deeper and to differentiate your offering from your competition in a given situation use this tool
Your Advantages compared to competitor Your Disadvantages compared to competitor
Competitor A ? ?
Competitor B ? ?
Competitor C ? ?
Competitor D ? ?
  • Feedback Questions
  • How well does our solution address the needs and goals you expressed earlier?
  • What other advantages do you see in our solution?
  • How closely does this solution fit your budget & timeline?
  • How will you determine the success of our solution?
  • What needs do you see that I might have missed?
  • Alessandra presented three case studies on the effectiveness of using various combinations assessments during recruiting and hiring. As the saying goes, “your results may vary.”  Nonetheless, using assessments before offering a position to a candidate increases the likelihood of a successful hire.
This concludes the major BFOs from the first day of the Business Excellence Forum.  Stay tuned for day 2’s BFOs, coming soon.

February Is National Time Management Month

Since the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) has declared February to be National Time Management Month, and in honor that, I’ve decided to vary from my usual theme of effective delegation.  So here are a few strategies and tips that will help you better manage your time, and ultimately, yourself.  As it has often been said, time is our most precious resource.  At an ActionCOACH conference a few years ago, Stedman Graham summed it up saying that time is the great equalizer, no matter who you are you have twenty-four hours in a day, no more, no less.  For the most part, billionaires use their twenty-four more effectively than the rest of us. The following tips, strategies and tactics are from the ActionCOACH TimeRICH seminar:
  1. When you have a choice, use the following two factors to decide to invest your time on an activity or task:
    1. Is this “thing” worth more than your minimum dollar threshold (whatever you decide that number to be)? If you haven’t yet developed your “worth” invest some effort to calculate an hourly dollar value of your time as soon as possible.  This is very important because every time you say YES to an activity or project, you are effectively saying NO to many others.
    2. Does this “thing” contribute toward accomplishing one or more of your goals? You must strive to relate EVERYTHING you invest your time in to your goals.
  2. Build an extended team, not only employees, that you can delegate (not abdicate) items to. That’s how the billionaires get leverage, you can too.  If they are knowledgeable about the “thing” you are delegating, your extended team may include your CPA, attorneys, family, mentors, etc.  Do not delegate to unqualified people.  Also, remember in a corporate environment, if you are careful, you can delegate upward.
  3. One of the best habits I adopted after I completed ActionCOACH induction training is – Never finish today, until you plan tomorrow. Before I leave my office, I list out my must achieves for the next day.
  4. Be Militant about those who undervalue your time by interrupting. You can:
    1. Get lost – work remotely
    2. Not answer the phone – call screening works
    3. Regulate email – you can set the polling interval in most email apps
    4. Be busy and be obvious about it
    5. Set the timer on the bomb (my favorite), “I have a call in five minutes”
  5. Block your time – create a default diary (ideal calendar, default calendar) communicate it and stick to it.
These five tips are just the tip (no pun intended) of the iceberg.  My colleagues at ActionCOACH and I have a wealth of effective time management strategies at our fingertips.  If you are find that there are not enough hours in the day, or you are totally overwhelmed by the “things” on your plate, WE CAN HELP!  Just contact me or any of my ActionCOACH colleagues.

Are Things Going Well?

Earlier this week I attended a breakfast event, part of the Hofstra University Scott Skodnek Business Development Center’s Distinguished Lecture Series.  The event was a Keynote Conversation with Brett Yormark, the CEO of Brooklyn Sports & Entertainment.  Mr. Yormark was interviewed by Kevin Law, the President & CEO of the Long Island Association. Brooklyn Sports & Entertainment (BSE) owns and operates the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Nets NBA team and redeveloped and manages the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Nassau County, Long Island.  Since Hofstra University is basically across the street from the Coliseum, many of the interview questions revolved around its redevelopment.  After answering some questions about improvements to the venue, the construction process and its cost verses the budget, Mr. Yormark moved onto the performance of the Coliseum since it reopened in April of this year.  The venue reopened with a Billy Joel concert.  In the seven months since the Coliseum reopened, they have had more than 100 events, including concerts by Barbara Streisand, Paul McCartney, Bruno Mars and other performers. Other events including G-League professional and college basketball games also occurred there.  So far, the Coliseum is ahead of BSEs projections. So, when Kevin Law asked Brett Yormark if he is happy with Coliseum results so far, Yormark replied:

“I am happy, but not satisfied.”

He used that exact wording to answer several additional questions as the interview progressed.  I was struck by how simple and yet very powerful this phrase is.  The concept represented by these six words is extremely important.  How many businesses have stopped growing or failed because management or owners became “satisfied?”  When I had my consulting practice before joining the ActionCOACH team, I met many business owners who were earning more than $500,000 per year who became satisfied with their businesses.  “Why should I continue to push hard, I’m making more than I need?”  “I am working too hard and have no time to enjoy my wealth.”  Many wanted to start enjoying the fruits of their success, reducing the attention and time they devoted to their businesses.  Many of those businesses no longer exist, failed due to over-satisfaction and the resulting lack of attention. Two things need to be highlighted here:
  1. I don’t mean to imply that you shouldn’t celebrate when a major goal or milestone is achieved. There is nothing wrong with a brief pause to celebrate and “smell the roses.”  Celebration is very important, for you and your team.
  2. One of the motivating factors that drove my decision to join ActionCOACH (and many of my colleagues) is our definition of a successful business:

A commercial, profitable enterprise that works without YOU (the owner)

I work with my clients to design, plan, structure and build their businesses so they will earn more and work less.  I enable them to achieve the state of happy life, but continuing dis-satisfaction with the value their business brings to their team, customers, community, and themselves.

At lunch, that same day, I continued my rereading of John C. Maxwell’s The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership ((10th Anniversary Edition). I came to Law 18-The Law of Sacrifice.  The following from Law 18 makes the point.

“…today’s success is the greatest threat to tomorrow’s success. And what gets a team (or company) to the top isn’t what keeps it there.”

I couldn’t have said it better. My ActionCOACH colleagues or I will be happy to assist you to build your business, so you can earn more and work less.

More on Time Management

Reading a John C. Maxwell article in the September 2017 edition of Success about time management, entitled “4 Tips to Set Yourself Up for a Better Tomorrow Today” got me thinking.  On a hunch, I went back and reviewed several other articles, publications and the ActionCOACH TimeRICH seminar on the subject of time management and was able to confirm my conclusion that

Time Management is really Self Management!

This is not exactly a new idea, I’ve said this during numerous presentations.  So why highlight it now in this blog?  It seems to me that many of us brush off the importance of time-self management.  Taking an “I am what I am” attitude rather than seeking to improve our use of our time.  Thus, I am going to reiterate a few of our top self-time management tips:
  • Set personally motivating goals – if your goals are truly important to you, you must strive to connect every activity to them. In the article, Maxwell encourages creating a Priority Inventory, another way of looking at the connection of your goals to your activities.
  • Don’t finish today until you plan tomorrow – Maxwell explains two concepts in his article; be deliberate in your use of time, and hone your decision-making skills. Once you increase your awareness of your goals and their relationship to your activities, you will become more deliberate in your investment of time.  The decision as to what to address and what not to address will become easier, enhancing your self management.  Remember, every time you say “YES” to something, you are saying “NO” to many other activities.
  • Create a Default Diary – a schedule of how you intend to invest your time on “normal” days. Your Default Diary (Ideal Week or Default Calendar, we use these terms interchangeably at ActionCOACH) accomplishes many things; it sets your time expectations, and communicates them.  You will feel uneasy when your activities conflict with your internal clock once it has been set via your Default Diary.  Many of my clients use their Default Calendar as a communication tool with their teams, using the tool to create “deep thinking” time slots.
  • Delegate – Effective delegation is the key to successful time and self management. None of us are expert or skilled in all aspects necessary for the success of our businesses or lives.  We are faced with the choice to do it all, abdicate or delegate numerous times every day.  Should I change the oil in my car myself?  Should I abdicate the oil change by simply dropping off the car at my local service station? Or, should I effectively delegate the oil change by carefully selecting the service station or dealer, asking them about the oil and filter they are going to use, and all the other details related to the oil change?  I used this example to exemplify the fact that we can all delegate to our extended team even if we have no direct employees.  When delegating, John Maxwell makes the point the we should not mistake activity for advancement.  This applies to those we delegate to, as well as ourselves.
John C. Maxwell included the following quote in the article:

“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Improve them, and they will become the brightest gems.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Remember, you cannot replenish your time, once a moment is gone, it is gone.  As Steadman Graham said at one of our ActionCOACH conferences,

“Time is the great equalizer.  We all have 24 hours in a day.”

His message continued to say that the very wealthy use their time more effectively.  How are you investing your precious time?  My colleagues and I at ActionCOACH are uniquely qualified to assist you toward effective delegation and successful self and time management.