Highlights from My Vacation Reading

I took the first two weeks of August for a trip to Europe with my wife, Tammy.  Tammy joined one of Berkshire Choral International’s groups which rehearsed and sang in Budapest, Hungary.  While she was in rehearsals I toured Budapest and caught up on my reading, both business and pleasure.  Following are comments about and links to a few of the articles that struck a chord.
  • Jason Fried in the July/August 2017 issue of INC Magazine in an article headlined Starbucks Wasn’t Built in a Day, subtitled “Entrepreneurs are told to go big or go home. Stop obsessing over scale, and perfect the basics.”   In the article Jason talks about John who wishes to open a tea shop, but often drifted to talking about his next shop, and his next shop, etc.  He advises John to slow down and get the basics right before focusing on rapid growth.  I have long agreed with this philosophy.  While there is nothing wrong with having big long range goals, we emphasize long term planning at ActionCOACH, one needs not to get ahead of one’s self.  One of the major points of the ActionCOACH 5-Way Formula is that a business must be built in balance.  Before I joined ActionCOACH, I had several turn-around clients.  One in particular, a consumer goods company, had great marketing and product, but couldn’t reliably deliver their products to their customers, the retail stores.  Ultimately their customers abandoned them in favor of suppliers that had great product, marketed well and consistently delivered.  My client had grown their business out of balance, and could not cover the basics.
  • In the July 2017 issue of Golf Digest an article about confidence by Sam Weinman titled What If Everything You’ve Been Told To Think Is Wrong? caught my eye. Within the article are several concepts that apply equally to business as well as golf.  One very important concept was highlighted by a quote from Dr. Fran Pirozzolo, a sports psychologist and mental-skills coach “Confidence is a garbage term in that it induces illusions of competence.”  If in business, we confuse confidence with competence, our mind will be closed to our limitations and that will limit our ability to construct plans to overcome them.  It is the difference between an “I Know” attitude which cuts off learning and an “Isn’t that interesting” attitude which encourages learning.

Another concept applicable to business revolves around Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck’s division of our mind-sets into two categories:

– Fixed mind-set – people who seek validation of their abilities – Growth mind-set – people who believe their skills can be cultivated through effort

The final concept that jumped off the page also came from Dr. Pirozzolo – “Don’t believe the hype.”  During my career in the fashion industry, I was aware of countless fashion designers who crashed and burned because they believed the hype and were unable to adjust to changing market and business realities.

  • From the September 2017 issue of Success Magazine John C. Maxwell has an article about time management 4 Tips to Set Yourself Up for a Better Tomorrow Today.” The title of the article says it all.  In our TimeRICH seminar, we encourage the audience to be militant about their time.  Along the militant line, Maxwell’s article contains a great quote I intend to add to the TimeRICH presentation:

“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Improve them, and they will become the brightest gems.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

These are just a few of the ideas I gleaned during my vacation reading, I hope you will find them useful.

Net Promoter Score and Your Business

During recent coaching sessions, the subject of Net Promoter Score (NPS) came up.  My clients wanted to learn what NPS is and how it might benefit their businesses.  Thus, I thought this is a good time to share a few ideas about NPS. What Is Net Promoter Score? Simply put, NPS is a very simple, direct, relatively easy, and effective method to measure your customer’s (client’s, patient’s) loyalty to your business and the likelihood they will refer your business to others.  In other words, how healthy is your customer experience and your customer relationships?  It was developed by (and a registered trademark of) Fred ReichheldBain & Company, and Satmetrix Systems. Net Promoter Score was introduced by Reichheld in his 2003 Harvard Business Review article “One Number You Need to Grow”.  NPS can be as low as −100 (everybody is a detractor) or as high as +100 (everybody is a promoter).  An NPS that is positive (i.e., higher than zero) is felt to be good, and an NPS of more than 50 is excellent. Why is NPS Important? Time after time in measuring conversion rate (as per the ActionCOACH 5-Way formula) by lead type, it is obvious that referral leads have the highest conversion rate of all lead sources.  Therefore, it is extremely important for your business to deliver a great customer experience (GCE).  A great customer experience will result in a high NPS.  A high NPS will enable your business to have a robust and consistently effective referral system.  The formula is

GCE -> HNPS -> NewCustomers -> Revenue -> Profit

Many successful ActionCOACH clients have achieved completely referral based businesses, with the ability to add as many new loyal customers as they can serve.  An added bonus to a referral based business is lower customer acquisition cost and higher lifetime customer value. How to Develop Your Net Promoter Score At its core, NPS is derived from a single question customer survey.  The question is

On a scale of 0 to 10, how likely is it that you would recommend our company/product/service to a friend, family member or colleague?”

Those who respond with a score of 9 to 10 are called Promoters, and are considered likely to exhibit value-creating behaviors, such as buying more, remaining customers for longer, and making more positive referrals to other potential customers. Those who respond with a score of 0 to 6 are labeled Detractors, and they are believed to be less likely to exhibit the value-creating behaviors. Responses of 7 and 8 are labeled Passives, and their behavior falls in the middle of Promoters and Detractors.  The Net Promoter Score is calculated by subtracting the percentage of customers who are Detractors from the percentage of customers who are Promoters. For purposes of calculating a Net Promoter Score, Passives count towards the total number of respondents, thus decreasing the percentage of detractors and promoters and pushing the net score towards zero. There are a variety of thoughts within the NPS consulting industry as to:
  • When to survey, and how often?
  • Types of surveys – relationship vs. transactional
  • Additional questions (if any), how many, what should they be?
  • How many people should be surveyed?
  • Format of the survey
There are many resources available to enhance your understanding and implementation of NPS.  This blog was based upon a great web article by Christian Reni ( https://customergauge.com/news/how-to-calculate-the-net-promoter-score/ ). If you wish to build your business on a solid foundation of raving fans who are both very loyal and who consistently refer new customers, NPS is an essential part of your toolkit.  My colleagues and I at ActionCOACH can assist you in building and implementing this important business building strategy.

2017 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of The Obvious Part 3

Day two was kicked off (no pun intended) by Tim Brown, 1987 Heisman Trophy winner, NFL Hall of Fame member, and very inspirational speaker.  Here are some of my Tim Brown BFOs:
  • Be the coach
    • Be sure of yourself & your approach
    • Emphasize team
    • Look for & guide team members to see their abilities & potential
  • Talent is not enough – you need mental strength to succeed
  • Realize that sometimes a mindset change may be required to move forward
  • img_9612-small
  • Seek mentors …
    • Who can show you something about yourself
    • See what you cannot see within you
    • Say what you need to hear, not what you want to hear
  • Don’t be adverse to using a proven system from elsewhere
  • Little things lead to big results
The next speaker was Richard Maloney, President of Engage and Grow, a strategic partner of ActionCOACH.  In the course of presenting the benefits and outline of the Engage & Grow 12-week program, Rich enlightened us about the current poor state of employee engagement, strategies to raise the level of engagement and the benefits thereof:
  • img_9637-small
across the USA only 24% of employees are highly engaged.  Another way of looking at that is img_9638-small on average two out of every ten of your team are so highly disengaged that they would sabotage your company, or jump ship.  If you think your team would score as more engaged, think again.  A survey of their clients found a 30% gap between senior management’s guess and the team’s actual level of engagement. img_9640-small The Engage & Grow program taps into the science of motivation.
  • A Deloitte survey found that companies with highly engaged teams were eight times more successful over a ten year period than industry peers with lower team engagement.
  • Our job is to change the lives in front of us.
Next up was Paul Dunn, Chairman of B1G1, a global business giving initiative on a mission to create a world full of giving.  Paul’s presentation was in keeping with this year’s BEF theme of Serve More to Earn More. Paul opened with the following quote from Sir Issacs Newton: img_9666-small Using www.internetlivestats.com in order to show that time is increasingly compressed, he displayed some live global stats for that moment: (2/21/2017):
  • 7,519 tweets / sec.
  • 2,472 Skype calls / sec.
  • 58,875 Google searches / sec.
  • 68,234 YouTube video uploads / sec.
  • 2,566,295 email / sec.
  • 42,125 gbytes / sec.
And img_9670-small He quoted Peter Diamandis: img_9674-small He urged us to EARN more to GIVE more, and vis-a-versa: img_9676-small to address these global issues There are two choices we can make: img_9678-small or img_9679-small “The challenge is not to be successful, the challenge is to matter more. – Seth Godin From Simon Sinek’s “Start With WHY” img_9684-small img_9686-small This wraps up part three of my 2017 BEFA BFOs.  There will be more Paul Dunn and Brad Sugars in part four.

Are you an Entrepreneur?

My wife and I took our grandsons to see, “School of Rock” on Broadway last weekend.  There is one line in the show that struck a chord with me: “Not everyone is cut out to be a rock star, but if you are, then you’ve got to go for it.” What struck me about that line is how it directly relates to business and my coaching practice: “Not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur, but if you are, then you’ve got to go for it.” In my mind, there are two types of entrepreneurs; active entrepreneurs and everyone else who has a job.  In other words, we are all entrepreneurs.  The days of two-way company/employee loyalty for 30-40 years is gone.  No more gold watches and fancy retirement parties.  Like it or not, we have become a society of “Me, Inc.”  We are our own bosses. But how do you know if you are cut out to be an active entrepreneur?  Here are some questions to ask yourself:
  1. Am I comfortable with an erratic schedule? Do I have good time management skills?  As an entrepreneur, you likely won’t be working 9-5.  As you gear up, 10-12 hour days are not uncommon; you’ll spend your time networking, blogging, researching, and marketing.  You will need to work on your business every day.
  2. Can I afford it? You need a safety net.  It can take up to six months or more to start to see a steady income.  Depending on the terms of your contracts, clients can take up to three months to pay.
  3. What could I do? Two ways to go here:
    1. Skills and Talents: Evaluate your current career/work situation. Are there any skills that you can take and parlay into a business?
    2. Passion: Hobbies: many people have used their talents and created successful companies from their love of baking or knitting.
  4. What are my strengths and weaknesses? While it might be painful, ask your friends and family.  They will give you some good insight regarding how you are with people, taking initiative, or seeing a project to the end.  A word of caution here, do not let family and friends dissuade you from pursuing your dream.  Also, don’t underestimate self-assessment tools – such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® or the DiSC which can provide self-awareness.
Assuming these items don’t scare you, what’s next?
  1. Plan. Our philosophy at ActionCOACH is to start planning as early as possible.  Most businesses grow organically, without planning.  Often, that leads to problems down the road.
  2. Research. Talk to other people who are already doing it.  You need to know the good, the bad, and the ugly.  Arm yourself with as much information as possible.  Additionally, there are many excellent books that address entrepreneurship as well as your area of expertise.  Never stop learning.
  3. Get all necessary certifications. The cost of the schooling may be tax deductible.
  4. Start small. Get the word out with friends and family about the service(s) or product(s) you are offering.  Word of mouth is one of the most effective marketing tools.
  5. Don’t wait until you get laid off. Lay the groundwork as soon as possible.
  6. Most important, hire an ActionCOACH to help you write a business plan, outline goals, and be the most effective president of “Me, Inc.”
Even if you decide you do not wish to be an active entrepreneur, it is necessary to take most of the steps outlined above to succeed in your career.

Oops!

I pride myself on my organizational skills and attention to detail.  Since my coaching practice depends on both, I’ve developed spreadsheets, procedures, and extensive files on my shared disk drive which enable me to run my business effectively and efficiently.  It’s a system that works well, enables leverage, and keeps me in check. So, imagine my chagrin when all too late, I – or rather my wife – discovered a typo in my December newsletter that was missed by both me and my assistant.  It’s hard to correct without jamming up people’s inboxes so the most I could hope for is … laughter! Yes, we have to laugh at these minor transgressions and put them into perspective.  In this case, my assistant indicated 2016, not 2017 for a January seminar.  She herself laughed and said that she was still writing 2014 on checks.  I had little choice but to laugh along with her because this is very likely a universal thing.  (By the way, as I finalize this toward the end of December, I note that although many opened the December newsletter, no one called me out about the typo.) All too often, we are quick to point out errors and mistakes – as my wife did about the incorrect year.  I think it gives us some satisfaction knowing that we are all flawed.  So how do you overcome setbacks like this?  Here’s a formula:
  1. Be above the line.  Apologize without making excuses.  Saying “I’m sorry” acknowledges the mistake and demonstrates being accountable.  Likewise, if you are on the receiving end of the error, give the person a chance to own up to it without using accountability as a weapon.
  2.  Correct.  After you apologize, ask how you can make it right.  Come up with ideas on your own and collaborate with peers if necessary.  And, on the receiving end, listen and appreciate.
  3. Learn.  There is a vast body of published biographies, auto biographies, business books, articles and knowledge that equate failure and mistakes with prerequisites to success. Bottom line, you’ve got to Learn to Earn.
On the other hand, if you keep making the same mistakes, then it’s time to hire an ActionCOACH business coach to help you break through the obstacles that may be holding you back.  In addition, if you need to design your business to maximize your leverage or would like to learn more about bringing your business and yourself above the line of choice, contact myself or any of my colleagues for a no obligation complementary coaching diagnostic session and learn how we can add value to you and your business.

Applying Pareto’s Law to Your Life (and Business)

Many of us have heard that 80% of your results are achieved by 20% of your efforts. Since Pareto introduced that concept back in 1896 by identifying that 80% of Italy’s land was owned by 20% of the population, it has since been applied to science, engineering, healthcare, and sports. My assistant claims that 80% of what you wear comes from 20% of your wardrobe so the applications are limitless. As a business coach, my clients frequently complain that there’s just not enough time to get everything done.  Upon discussion, we have a lightbulb moment in which the client realizes that s/he is spending 80% of their time on trivial matters and only 20% of their time cultivating their core business, the very antithesis of what they should be doing.  During our coaching sessions, I suggest these ways to increase their productivity – and profits – by incorporating the 80/20 rule:
  1. Focus on the 20% of your customers who are generating 80% of your profits. Cultivate those relationships and watch your bank account grow!  Delegate the rest to your sales team and help them to nurture the future 20%.
  2. Identify the 20% of your friends and business associates who can provide 80% of your support, be it marketing or emotional. Conversely, eliminate the 20% – or more – of those who drain you of your energy or stand in the way of your success.
  3. Find the 20% of the tasks that you truly enjoy which bring the greatest reward and put 80% of your energy into them. The rest can be delegated or outsourced.
  4. 80% of a business’s problems come from 20% of the business. Is the 20% related to production?  Delivery?  A particular employee?  Periodically review your processes, policies and procedures.  Communicate expectations to your staff regularly.  This is about fire prevention.
The common thread here is to simplify as much as you are able.  Granted, the way we work has changed dramatically over the last two decades and we’re now “on” 24/7.  However, by discovering how we are using our time, we can make informed decisions about how we choose to spend it. My colleagues and I are ready to assist you in applying Pareto’s Law to your business and your life.  Contact any of us for a no obligation complementary coaching diagnostic session and learn how we can add value to you and your business.

Let’s Talk About Government Regulations

This post is a follow up to a Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter post that I published a few days ago.  While reading an article in the July/August 2016 edition of INC Magazine entitled “Taming the Beast” (http://on.inc.com/28Sr8x4) by Leigh Buchanan, I was astounded by some of the examples of well-intended silliness mentioned.  In addition, I appreciated that the article didn’t simply state the challenge without offering some suggested solutions. The first example of regulatory over-burden involved a relatively small craft winery in Brooklyn, NY.  The CEO, Brian Leventhal fills out monthly reports to each and every state his company ships, or has shipped product to.  The information requested on the reports vary by state, but generally includes the name and address of each purchaser of their wine.  Furthermore, he must file reports to states even if he had no shipments during the previous month to customers within that state.  Mr. Leventhal is quoted in the article saying “it looks like [rules governing the wine industry] exist only because someone made them up that way 80 years ago.” The article goes on to site some statistics about the proliferation of regulations; 3,400 federal regulations in 2015, 545 with direct effect on small business, for example.  In a survey about regulation conducted by Paychex, 39 percent responded that over-regulation dissuaded them from entering a new market, 36 percent from introducing a new product, and 25 percent did not start new business ventures into a new kind of business.  Further, that survey found that 65 percent of the respondents reported that regulations hurt their profitability or their opportunities to grow. Philip K. Howard, founder of Common Good, a non-profit with the mission of applying common sense toward reducing government bureaucracy is quoted as saying “America is run by dead people.  The people who wrote these rules are dead, so you can’t argue with them or hold them accountable.”  Regulations are like plastic bags or embarrassing social media posts: once they are out, you can’t get rid of them. I invite you to respond to this blog with a list of the top few regulations that hurt your industry or company.  You might highlight your number one target for elimination or revision.  I also invite any suggestions about regulations that should remain, with or without revisions. Finally, if me or my colleagues at ActionCOACH can assist you with overcoming your regulatory constraints, please contact us to learn what is possible to keep you ahead of your competition.

2016 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of the Obvious Part 2

More BFOs from Day 1 of the 2016 BEF, Troy Hazard continued. Troy told a story about car salesman who had sold him a luxury car in Australia where he lived before moving to the USA a few years ago. The salesman asked how often he traded cars in, Troy answered about every 4 years. The salesman began contacting Troy about every 6 to 8 weeks, by mail, email, telephone, you name it – when Troy moved to USA permanently the salesman continued kept in touch.  After about 4 years the salesman called to say it’s time for a new car.  Troy told the salesman that he permanently moved to US and salesman continued to stay in touch.  On a family visit back to AU, Troy dropped into the dealer and asked the salesman why he continued to stay in touch, answer … “I sold more than 100 cars to your friends.”  The business question to ask yourself is; How is my business staying in touch with our customers, members, advocates and raving fans? (See the following section – day one BFOs from Brad Sugars – The Ladder of Customer Loyalty). Next, Troy urged us to always have absolute clarity of where the money/profit comes from.  His example was an electrician who repositioned to being a Total Energy Solution. Troy also told us about one of his companies that had five salesmen.  Following a typical bell curve, at one end of the curve was a salesman who was only doing about $60,000 in commissions and was way below quota.  In the middle were three salesmen at or slightly above quota, earning $100,000 to $125,000 in commission income.  At the other end of the bell curve was a salesman who was pulling in about $275,000 in commissions.  Troy then threw a trick question at us, asking who he fired.  Most guessed the $60K salesman.  In fact he fired the $275K salesman, explaining that he was disruptive, not a team player, stealing leads from the others, didn’t embrace the company culture, etc.  The business question here is who on your team is not fully engaged with the mission/vision/culture of your business?  By the way, he also fired the 60K salesman. The final BFO from Troy Hazard was very simple; Change or Die, one change at a time!   Our next speaker was Brad Sugars, the founder and chairman of ActionCOACH.  Brad opened with the statement that “Profit comes from REPEAT BUSINESS.” Next Brad presented the ActionCOACH Ladder of Customer Loyalty. IMG_7935 small The first rung of the ladder is Suspect – a target or an ideal customer.

Suspects are moved up the ladder to Prospect via marketing.  Prospects have taken some action; responded to an ad, visited your store, called to ask buying questions, etc.  The BFO here relates to the ActionCOACH 5 Way Formula, “if the Conversion Rate is low, the Target is WRONG!”Prospects are moved up the ladder via sales to Shopper. Shoppers have made their first purchase.  The BFO that Brad mentioned here is “the 2nd purchase is 10 times more important than subsequent purchases.”

Shoppers become Customers when they make that all important second purchase.  This is where you begin to build a relationship with your customer.  Have a consistent point of contact and establish genuine know-like-trust in the relationship.

As you develop stronger and stronger relationships with Customers they can become Members.  Members will develop a sense of belonging.  The sense of belonging must be enhanced by superior, personalized customer service and continued relationship building.  The BFO here is Great Customer Service starts with doing business with those you want to do business with (see Target above).

Continued relationship building and consistent superior customer service will result in your Members moving up to Advocates.  A major BFO here is every customer defines customer service differently, that is why building strong relationships is the KEY.  Advocates will refer their friends and network to your business.

If you consistently deliver exceptional customer service and continue to build relationships, your Advocates will become Raving Fans.  Raving fans will refer all of their friends and their networks to your business.

Whew, this wraps up my BFOs from only the first day of the 2016 BEF.  Stay tuned, there is much more to come.

Three Mini Blogs

Effective Delegation – Step 1 I’ve been rereading “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” by Stephen R. Covey.  In 7 Habits, an important distinction is made between “Gofer Delegation” and “Stewardship Delegation.”  I realized that in my ongoing series of blogs on the subject of Effective Delegation I failed to make clear that the series is focused solely on Stewardship Delegation. Aside from deciding to actually begin delegating and having a plan as to what items to delegate, the first step in delegating any responsibility under Stephen Covey’s and my definition of stewardship delegation is defining and communicating the Desired Result.  Once the desired result is clear and understood by both you (the delegator) and the person you are delegating to (the “delegatee”), they are enabled to take responsibility to deliver that result.  It is up to the delegatee to determine how the methods that will be implemented to deliver the desired result.  This mutual understanding of the target is the foundation upon which leverage and success is built.   A Strong Reference to an Article (and Book) In the January 2016 edition of “Success” magazine there is a wonderful article by Amy Morin entitled “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do excerpted from her book of the same title.  Here are the headlines, please read the article or the book for the details:
  1. Waste time feeling sorry for themselves
  2. Give away their power
  3. Shy away from change
  4. Squander energy on things they can’t control
  5. Worry about pleasing everyone
  6. Fear taking risks
  7. Dwell on the past
  8. Repeat their mistakes
  9. Resent other people’s successes
  10. Give up after their first failure
  11. Fear “alone time”
  12. Feel the world owes them something
  13. Expect immediate results
I’m sure you will benefit from learning more about this important subject.   Headline in a Newspaper The other day I read the following headline “Pressure on Apple for Its Next Big Thing.”  This headline reminded me of one of the key things I learned when I was consulting at a company in the midst of a turn-around attempt.  The simple lesson is that there is never a “Silver Bullet.”  The company I was working with got into deep financial trouble because they keep searching to the one product that would save the business.  In fact they already had an excellent product offering that they could not reliably and consistently deliver.  One by one their retail customer base stopped ordering from them. You may be thinking that their silver bullet was fixing their fulfillment process.  Their inability to fulfill orders was a result of several factors including poor inventory control, poor bookkeeping and a lack of sales analysis, to name just a few.  One of the main messages of the ActionCOACH 5 Way Formula – Business Chassis is that your business can achieve massive results if you cover your bases and grow your business in balance. My colleagues and I will be happy to work with you to implement any of the concepts mentioned in the blog.

What Can We Learn About Business From PGA Tour Winner Jimmy Walker?

Jimmy Walker has not had an easy road to success on the PGA Tour.  He won his first tour event at 34 years of age, after going 0 for 187 during his first seven seasons on tour.  During the last two PGA Tour seasons he has won five times.  That is quite a turnaround.  So what does his success playing golf at the highest level over the last two seasons have to do with your business Mr. Business Owner? Like you, Jimmy Walker opened his business, he opened by turning pro, you opened by asking customers to pay you for your product or service.  He had some initial success, making his way onto the PGA Tour via the Tour’s Q-School, making some tournament cuts and earning some prize money.  Your business has provided you with some income and perhaps some personal stability and quality of life. Jimmy has had some OK seasons and some not so OK seasons.  At one point his wife considered going back to work because Jimmy’s business was running at a loss and they were close to running out of money.  The low point of his tour career was in the 2009 season when he sunk to 125th on the money list.  You may have had some ups and downs in your business.  You may have had some losing years.  And you too may have been close to running out of cash.  After all, very few businesses take off like a rocket, earning consistent growth and profit year after year.  In addition, many businesses initially grow and then level off, seemingly stall. So what did Jimmy do to achieve the success he has had during the last two seasons?

“About four years ago I made a shift in the way I do things.  I was tired of finishing 125th in money.  I was working hard but working on the wrong things and I wanted to figure out what to change, how to put different people in place to help me get better.” – Jimmy Walker in an interview in the November 2015 edition of Golf Magazine.

Jimmy knows he has the talent to succeed.  He also realizes that to maximize his talent he needs to have the right team in place.  If you have been in business for more than a few months and are making a profit in addition to paying yourself a salary, then it is safe to assume that you have the talent succeed.  Or maybe your business is just bumping along, barely profitable or merely breaking even.  In either situation, the questions you should ask yourself are:
  • Am I working hard on the wrong things?
  • Do I have the right extended team helping me maximize my talents?
If you answered YES to the first question or NO to the second question, you owe it to yourself to contact me or any of my ActionCOACH colleagues.  We will be happy to assist you in reversing those answers and maximizing your results.

Remember the definition of insanity – Doing the same thing and expecting different results Don’t Be Insane!