You Can’t Do It All

The cover story in the current (January-February 2019) edition of Entrepreneur Magazine is a profile of Michael Strahan (Link to the article).  Not being a daytime TV viewer, or a NY Giants fan, I was not very familiar with him.  Until I read the article, I was almost totally unaware of Michael Strahan’s many accomplishments after retiring from the National Football League.  There are a few things we can learn from his business career after his playing days were behind him. It Is What It Is Until It Isn’t – Not unlike many pro athletes, Strahan had no plan what he would do once the game ended for him.  Nonetheless, he piled up an impressive playing record; fifteen seasons (the average NFL playing career is only 3 years).  That level of longevity speaks to a dedication to be the best defensive end he could be.  He gave his all to his football career until it was over.  Are you totally engaged in your business? Deal With Pressure – After the NFL, Strahan went into sportscasting.  Leaving football introduced the concern and possibility the he would “suck” (his word) at something.  “You don’t want to be the weak link.” He said.  He realized that facing a 350-pound opponent who was trying to smash his head in was more pressure than “shaking a dude’s hand and asking him a few questions.”  He put the pressure of a new role into perspective.  Are you putting the day-to-day pressure you face in your business into perspective? Build Your Team – Along the way, Strahan, influenced by his career in professional football, a team sport, assembled a very effective team.  As he said in the article:

“I understand that it’s a bigger team than just you on the camera.  The most important people are the ones behind the camera.”  He went on to say, “You understand how important the support system is in sports, and that has carried over to me in business.  Because there’s nothing worse than feeling that you do a job no one values.  Each job is important – I don’t care if you’re cleaning out the garbage cans or working the phones or running the company.  Everybody has value, and football taught me to make people feel that value to get the best out of them.” (emphasis added)

Great insight toward building an effective TEAM. If you want to build a highly effective team for your business, a team that will enable you, your business and the team itself to bring amazing value to your customers and community, my ActionCOACH colleagues and I are ready to help.  All you must do is pick up the phone, tablet or keyboard and contact an ActionCOACH business coach.

The Nine Keys to Effective Delegation

I can’t believe that it has been four years since my last blog post about effective delegation.  I find this fact surprising because effective delegation within a business is one of the most important foundations of long-term success.  Without delegation at all levels of a team, the company and team members will not maximize each of their potential to create value for themselves, their customers (clients or patients), their company, their market and their community. Following are the nine keys to effective and successful delegation:
  1. Present the desired result and confirm it is fully understood. If you ever listened to your pilot communicating with air traffic control while flying, you would have noticed that the pilot doesn’t just acknowledge the controller’s instruction.  The pilot always repeats the instruction back to the controller.  That insures the instruction was fully understood.  When you delegate, it is imperative that the person you are delegating to, repeats the desired result back to you.  Ask questions to make sure that there is complete understanding of the desired result.
  2. Present guidelines or limits as to how the result is to be achieved. Define the “playing field,” their authority to contact, direct or contract with other departments or outside resources they may need.  The company’s CPA or attorney for example.  Is the project or task confidential?  If so, what level of confidentiality is to be followed.
  3. Discuss the resources that are available. Budget, team, equipment or space must be clearly defined.
  4. Establish a timeline. Discuss time constraints or deadlines, both internal and external.  In situations where there is flexibility, buy-in can be achieved by asking “When can you have this completed?”
  5. Make yourself available if assistance is needed and requested. Make it clear to the delegatee that you are available if they ask for assistance.  And make it clear that such a request will not be held against them.  One common example of required assistance is to overcome the resistance of people in other departments within a company to respond to the delegatee because they do not have a high enough title.
  6. Set accountability and KPI’s to measure progress toward the goal. You cannot manage something if it is not measured.  Setting measurements supports Key 8 and eliminate disappointment and surprises.
  7. Discuss the consequences both good and bad related to the desired result. This is the opportunity to present why the desired result is important.
  8. Periodically follow up. Without follow up questions, such as “How’s it going?” or “Are you on schedule?” or similar, there is only abdication, not delegation.  I have observed many instances of failure due to lack of follow up.
  9. Do not Jump-In to rescue. You may need to assist when a project goes off the rails.  However, if you jump-in and take the project over, you are doomed to having this repeat on future projects.

Remember “Successful delegation has more to with the delegator … not the one being delegated to.” – Darren Hardy

The ActionCOACH DelegationRICH workshop expands and details this subject.  If you want to get leverage of your and your team’s time, knowledge and talents, my colleagues and I will be happy to assist you to become a world class delegator.

2018 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of the Obvious Part 3

The second day of BEF began with Darren Hardy, former publisher of Success magazine, and founder of Darren Hardy, LLC Success Mentor to CEOs & High-Achievers.  His presentation was entitled Productivity Secrets of SUPERACHEIVERS and was based on what he learned during his many interviews with some of the most successful people in the world. The following are a few of the many BFOs I got from Mr. Hardy’s presentation: img_1637-for-blog
  • YES is easy. NO is the master skill
  • 3 Activities – consider:
    • What should I have said NO to last week?
    • What should I say NO to next week?
    • What should I say NO to on my Idea, Project, Commitment & Communication Lists?
  • “To many choices create paralysis”
  • Warren Buffet’s Method
    • Step 1 – WRITE all your priorities
    • Step 2 Narrow the list down to your TOP 3
    • Throw the rest of the list away
  • Don’t mistake:
    • Movement for Achievement
    • Activity for Productivity
    • Rushing for Results
img_1669-for-blog
  • Create a “Give Up” list
  • Identify your Vital Few Functions
    • Delete / Delegate
    • Find & Focus on and leverage VITAL FUNCTIONS
  • “There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” – Peter Drucker
  • To be a SUPERACHIEVER
    • Stop doing
    • Master the Vital FEW
    • Out FOCUS
    • Out LAST (consistency)
    • Out GROW
    • Out FAIL – learn from mistakes
    Our next speaker was Travis Bell, The Bucket List Guy.  Travis was a speaker at the 2017 BEF (see 2017 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of the Obvious Part 4 for my BFOs from 2017).  Travis repeated a presentation he delivered to the ActionCOACH coaches only.  This year he presented to the entire audience.  There is a few additional BFOs added to last year’s Travis Bell BFOs:  
  • The ultimate KPI is How Many People Come to Your Funeral
  • Go from Selfish to Selfless
  • Separate bucket list from to do list
Our next presenter was Steve Rogers, CEO of Alchemy Advisors.  Before founding Alchemy Advisors, Mr. Rogers was the President of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services.  Here are a few of the many BFOs from Mr. Rogers:
  • There is no perfect
  • The constant question – What will have occurred in the next 12 months to consider it a very successful year?
  • And
img_1744-for-blog Brad Sugars took the stage to wrap up day 2:
  • All of my clients have a Future Organization Chart (3 to 5 years in the future) These need to add a Timeline & Triggers to each new position on the chart
  • “Saving a wage cost me a fortune” – Brad Sugars
  • Hiring is not the same as Recruiting
  • Have at least 1 personal goal in your 90 day plan
  • Success:

See Your Goal Understand The Obstacles Create a Positive Mental Picture Clear Your Mind of Self-Doubt Embrace The Challenge Stay On Track Show The World You Can Do It

  Day 3 – A few BFOs from the coach’s session From ActionCOACH Kevin Simpson, a coach in Canada.  A few insights from his clients:
  • His bike shop client reduced the number of bikes on the sales floor, resulting in selling more units at higher prices
  • Conversation around what is possible. In the 19th century during the construction of a railroad, 32 spikers hammered in 63,000 spikes, each averaging 600 blows per hour for 14 hours.  They constructed 6.3 miles of track that day, which at the time was a record.  So the question is – Do we limit ourselves by our perception of what is possible?
  • To eliminate Bottle Necks – Communicate Priorities
  img_1774-for-blogimg_1785-for-blog
    • be in Area 4
    • Area 1 – Intention & Attention / no money – EXCUSE (below point of power)
    • Area 2 – Money & Intention / no attention – BLAME
    • Area 3 – Money & Attention / not aligned – DENIAL
    • Area 4 – Congruency (above the point of power)
  And finally, from a couple of conversations during breaks:
  • A business is finished (Step 6 of 6 Steps to Massive Results) when it achieves the ActionCOACH definition of a successful business
  • Content is GREAT / Context is IT!
  • “Where there is SHIT, there is FERTILIZER
  I hope you have formed your own BFOs from this blog series. The 2019 Business Excellence Forum will be in Charlotte, SC from February 17th to the 19th.  If you wish to join me and about 1,000 other business owners, CEOs, leaders, executives and business coaches, or if you would like to accelerate your success, please contact me or any of my ActionCOACH colleagues.  Our mission is to create

World Abundance Through Business Re-Education

February Is National Time Management Month

Since the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) has declared February to be National Time Management Month, and in honor that, I’ve decided to vary from my usual theme of effective delegation.  So here are a few strategies and tips that will help you better manage your time, and ultimately, yourself.  As it has often been said, time is our most precious resource.  At an ActionCOACH conference a few years ago, Stedman Graham summed it up saying that time is the great equalizer, no matter who you are you have twenty-four hours in a day, no more, no less.  For the most part, billionaires use their twenty-four more effectively than the rest of us. The following tips, strategies and tactics are from the ActionCOACH TimeRICH seminar:
  1. When you have a choice, use the following two factors to decide to invest your time on an activity or task:
    1. Is this “thing” worth more than your minimum dollar threshold (whatever you decide that number to be)? If you haven’t yet developed your “worth” invest some effort to calculate an hourly dollar value of your time as soon as possible.  This is very important because every time you say YES to an activity or project, you are effectively saying NO to many others.
    2. Does this “thing” contribute toward accomplishing one or more of your goals? You must strive to relate EVERYTHING you invest your time in to your goals.
  2. Build an extended team, not only employees, that you can delegate (not abdicate) items to. That’s how the billionaires get leverage, you can too.  If they are knowledgeable about the “thing” you are delegating, your extended team may include your CPA, attorneys, family, mentors, etc.  Do not delegate to unqualified people.  Also, remember in a corporate environment, if you are careful, you can delegate upward.
  3. One of the best habits I adopted after I completed ActionCOACH induction training is – Never finish today, until you plan tomorrow. Before I leave my office, I list out my must achieves for the next day.
  4. Be Militant about those who undervalue your time by interrupting. You can:
    1. Get lost – work remotely
    2. Not answer the phone – call screening works
    3. Regulate email – you can set the polling interval in most email apps
    4. Be busy and be obvious about it
    5. Set the timer on the bomb (my favorite), “I have a call in five minutes”
  5. Block your time – create a default diary (ideal calendar, default calendar) communicate it and stick to it.
These five tips are just the tip (no pun intended) of the iceberg.  My colleagues at ActionCOACH and I have a wealth of effective time management strategies at our fingertips.  If you are find that there are not enough hours in the day, or you are totally overwhelmed by the “things” on your plate, WE CAN HELP!  Just contact me or any of my ActionCOACH colleagues.

More on Time Management

Reading a John C. Maxwell article in the September 2017 edition of Success about time management, entitled “4 Tips to Set Yourself Up for a Better Tomorrow Today” got me thinking.  On a hunch, I went back and reviewed several other articles, publications and the ActionCOACH TimeRICH seminar on the subject of time management and was able to confirm my conclusion that

Time Management is really Self Management!

This is not exactly a new idea, I’ve said this during numerous presentations.  So why highlight it now in this blog?  It seems to me that many of us brush off the importance of time-self management.  Taking an “I am what I am” attitude rather than seeking to improve our use of our time.  Thus, I am going to reiterate a few of our top self-time management tips:
  • Set personally motivating goals – if your goals are truly important to you, you must strive to connect every activity to them. In the article, Maxwell encourages creating a Priority Inventory, another way of looking at the connection of your goals to your activities.
  • Don’t finish today until you plan tomorrow – Maxwell explains two concepts in his article; be deliberate in your use of time, and hone your decision-making skills. Once you increase your awareness of your goals and their relationship to your activities, you will become more deliberate in your investment of time.  The decision as to what to address and what not to address will become easier, enhancing your self management.  Remember, every time you say “YES” to something, you are saying “NO” to many other activities.
  • Create a Default Diary – a schedule of how you intend to invest your time on “normal” days. Your Default Diary (Ideal Week or Default Calendar, we use these terms interchangeably at ActionCOACH) accomplishes many things; it sets your time expectations, and communicates them.  You will feel uneasy when your activities conflict with your internal clock once it has been set via your Default Diary.  Many of my clients use their Default Calendar as a communication tool with their teams, using the tool to create “deep thinking” time slots.
  • Delegate – Effective delegation is the key to successful time and self management. None of us are expert or skilled in all aspects necessary for the success of our businesses or lives.  We are faced with the choice to do it all, abdicate or delegate numerous times every day.  Should I change the oil in my car myself?  Should I abdicate the oil change by simply dropping off the car at my local service station? Or, should I effectively delegate the oil change by carefully selecting the service station or dealer, asking them about the oil and filter they are going to use, and all the other details related to the oil change?  I used this example to exemplify the fact that we can all delegate to our extended team even if we have no direct employees.  When delegating, John Maxwell makes the point the we should not mistake activity for advancement.  This applies to those we delegate to, as well as ourselves.
John C. Maxwell included the following quote in the article:

“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Improve them, and they will become the brightest gems.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Remember, you cannot replenish your time, once a moment is gone, it is gone.  As Steadman Graham said at one of our ActionCOACH conferences,

“Time is the great equalizer.  We all have 24 hours in a day.”

His message continued to say that the very wealthy use their time more effectively.  How are you investing your precious time?  My colleagues and I at ActionCOACH are uniquely qualified to assist you toward effective delegation and successful self and time management.

Three Mini Blogs

Effective Delegation – Step 1 I’ve been rereading “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” by Stephen R. Covey.  In 7 Habits, an important distinction is made between “Gofer Delegation” and “Stewardship Delegation.”  I realized that in my ongoing series of blogs on the subject of Effective Delegation I failed to make clear that the series is focused solely on Stewardship Delegation. Aside from deciding to actually begin delegating and having a plan as to what items to delegate, the first step in delegating any responsibility under Stephen Covey’s and my definition of stewardship delegation is defining and communicating the Desired Result.  Once the desired result is clear and understood by both you (the delegator) and the person you are delegating to (the “delegatee”), they are enabled to take responsibility to deliver that result.  It is up to the delegatee to determine how the methods that will be implemented to deliver the desired result.  This mutual understanding of the target is the foundation upon which leverage and success is built.   A Strong Reference to an Article (and Book) In the January 2016 edition of “Success” magazine there is a wonderful article by Amy Morin entitled “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do excerpted from her book of the same title.  Here are the headlines, please read the article or the book for the details:
  1. Waste time feeling sorry for themselves
  2. Give away their power
  3. Shy away from change
  4. Squander energy on things they can’t control
  5. Worry about pleasing everyone
  6. Fear taking risks
  7. Dwell on the past
  8. Repeat their mistakes
  9. Resent other people’s successes
  10. Give up after their first failure
  11. Fear “alone time”
  12. Feel the world owes them something
  13. Expect immediate results
I’m sure you will benefit from learning more about this important subject.   Headline in a Newspaper The other day I read the following headline “Pressure on Apple for Its Next Big Thing.”  This headline reminded me of one of the key things I learned when I was consulting at a company in the midst of a turn-around attempt.  The simple lesson is that there is never a “Silver Bullet.”  The company I was working with got into deep financial trouble because they keep searching to the one product that would save the business.  In fact they already had an excellent product offering that they could not reliably and consistently deliver.  One by one their retail customer base stopped ordering from them. You may be thinking that their silver bullet was fixing their fulfillment process.  Their inability to fulfill orders was a result of several factors including poor inventory control, poor bookkeeping and a lack of sales analysis, to name just a few.  One of the main messages of the ActionCOACH 5 Way Formula – Business Chassis is that your business can achieve massive results if you cover your bases and grow your business in balance. My colleagues and I will be happy to work with you to implement any of the concepts mentioned in the blog.

Why You Need Written Plans

“Planning without Action is futile, Action without planning is fatal” Unknown

One of the most profound concepts I have embraced since joining the ActionCOACH team is the many positive results of having written plans.  It is commonly believed that those who have written plans outperform their contemporaries by a large margin.  While the often quoted alumni studies at Harvard or Yale are urban myths, one actual study conducted by Gail Matthews at Dominican University, (to you can read her research summary click here) provides empirical evidence for the effectiveness of three coaching tools:
  • Accountability,
  • Commitment and
  • Writing down one’s goals. This study demonstrates that writing one’s goal enhances goal achievement.
You may fall into the group, along with the vast majority of people, who tried writing a plan on one or two occasions only to conclude that planning does not work.  Perhaps, you bit off more than you could reasonably accomplish, set unrealistic deadlines, did not set deadlines or your plans and goals were not specific enough.  Maybe you believe or concluded that planning is useless because plans are obsolete as soon as they are finished.  Regardless of your reasons for not planning in the past, I urge you to consider planning your business and your life starting now for the following reasons and benefits. First of all, planning is an ongoing process.  The main value of planning is periodically thinking about your business and your life in an organized manner.  When a planning process is followed, several things naturally occur:
  • You attain focus – you weed out the noise that naturally occurs in your life
  • You prioritize – things in a logical order prevent you from over committing (biting off more than you can reasonably accomplish).
  • Your filters open – your conscious and subconscious mind are opened to collect the resources, knowledge and partners you need to achieve your goals
  • You communicate – a plan is a great communication tool to use when you delegate and seek assistance
  • You create a great “rallying point” for your team
As Benjamin Franklin said, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”  We all have only twenty four hours in a day.  Effective use of time has a direct relationship to a person’s level of success.  It is what separates the successful from the unsuccessful, in all aspects of life.  Having plans will greatly increase the results you achieve from your twenty four hours. Finally, and most importantly, most businesses develop and grow organically, with little or no planning.  Many grow and reach a “point of no return” where, for example, they may be supporting an inefficient or counter-productive structure, the right people in the wrong roles or the wrong people in the right roles, or worst of all the wrong people in the wrong roles.  Their business may not be able to adjust to current market conditions in a timely fashion.  They might have over-expanded, under-expanded, passed on a promising opportunity or pursued a disastrous opportunity.  These situations become disastrous after a business passes the point beyond which it cannot “undo” and restart without more investment of time and capital than is available.  Thus, it is essential to avoid growing organically and hitting the point of no return by adopting a planning process as early as possible and of course sticking to it.  You can either have a reactive business or a proactive business.

2015 Business Excellence Forum – Blinding Flashes of the Obvious – Part 1

Last month I attended the 2015 North American Business Excellence Forum (#BEF2015) and Awards.  I am proud that my client, the Winthrop University Hospital Department of Pediatrics won the 2015 Best Not-For-Profit Business Excellence Award for the combination of their STAR Program for children with special needs, their DOWN program for children with Down Syndrome and their Hempstead Pediatrics practice.  In addition, The Cancer Center for Kids, Winthrop Women’s Wellness, and Women’s Contemporary Care Associates – Maternal Fetal Medicine were all finalists in more than one award category. This year’s forum had some amazing keynote speakers whose presentations yielded many Blinding Flashes of the Obvious (BFOs).  The following are some of the BFOs that struck a chord with me.  I am sure that some of these will have a similar affect on you.  If I am correct in that assumption, please join the conversation and add your comments to this post. Our first speaker was Jonathan MacDonald (www.jonathanmacdonald.com @jmacdonald), a well known international speaker on perpetual change & how to think differently about the future of business, society & technology.  Here goes:
  • Beat competitors by solving problems faster and/or better than them – simple and straight to the point
  • Establish a balance between rapid growth and tuning – sometimes growth needs to be briefly slowed down in order to fine tune operations in order to continue to consistently deliver.
  • The concept of Phase Shifting – why some companies always seem to introduce new, very cool, innovative products. To state this as simply as possible, a company’s first product may be a phase or step along their journey toward their true goal.  They continually solve the increasing difficulties while adding more value with each step.  Think how the USA was able to land a man on the moon. Or, is the Apple watch the end game or a phase?
Phase Shifting Slide
  • The ideal members of your team are those who have the will to succeed – you can train everything except will.
Our next speaker was Brad Sugars – Founder and Chairman of ActionCOACH.  Brad spoke about the 9 Potholes On The Road To Success:
  • Pothole #1 – Superhero Complex
    • Kills more businesses than any other pothole
    • Learn the art and science of DELEGATION
  • Pothole #2 – Scarcity Thinking
    • Move away from Limitations / Lack mindset
    • Move toward how Big is the market or how Big SHOULD my business be to accomplish my mission?
  • Pothole #3 – Doubters
    • They are all around you, learn to filter
  • Pothole #4 – Bad Decisions
    • Learn and move on
    • Always Test & Measure to limit possible damage
  • Pothole #5 – Out of Your Depth
    • Learn to Earn
    • Build a great team and delegate
  • Pothole #6 – FEAR
    • False Expectations Appearing Real – Collect the facts to eliminate the False
    • Failure Expected And Realized – Move beyond your self-fulfilling prophecies
    • Face Everything And Rise
  • Pothole #7 – Short Term Thinking
    • Plan / Execute / Measure / Review / Plan / Etc.
    • Phase Shift
  • Pothole #8 – Overwhelm
    • Break the Overwhelm cycle by taking action – one step at a time
  • Pothole #9 – Self Sabotage
    • Have a good look at yourself in the mirror
To be continued.

Can You Afford To Abdicate?

Abdication cost New York City more than $700 million for one project.  How much could abdication cost you? New York City’s Department of Investigations (DOI) released a report late last week about the $1.3 billion (original estimate) project to overhaul the NYC 911 emergency dispatch system.  The report, which is highly critical of the administration of former mayor Michael Bloomberg, contains the following sentence: “Bluntly, the most senior members of the administration simply failed to pay attention.” Further, DOI Commissioner Mark Peters said the city “paid a huge amount of money to a bunch of contractors and assumed (for a quick laugh regarding assumed see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfvTwv5o1Qs ) they’d get it right … in 2004, we say it’ll cost $1.3 billion and it’ll be done in 2007.  In fact, it’s going to cost more than $2 billion, and it’s not going to be done until 2017.” I noticed the following evidence of abdication, rather than effective delegation:
  • “The city relied excessively on outside consultants and failed to adequately monitor progress.” Simply setting things in motion without proper follow up and metrics is Abdication.
  • Whatever follow ups and measurements that were in place may not have been on an appropriate schedule – Abdication.
  • “An inordinate amount of time” on paperwork “detracted from the ability of staff” to do their jobs. Having ineffective reports and paperwork amounts to Abdication with a false sense of security.
So the primary question is, what are you abdicating in your business, and what could that cost you?  Obviously, your budget is not the size of NYC’s ($76.9 billion for fiscal 2015).  However, in proportion, your lack of effectively delegating key projects or ongoing operational tasks has the potential to do way more damage to your business.  The cost in lost profit, customers and opportunity could be enormous, if not fatal.   This is another installment in my ongoing series about the art and science of successful, effective delegation.

Effective Delegation vs. Abdication – Part 4

As part of my on-going series about the art and science of effective delegation, I will discuss two topics in this blog; The prerequisites of effective delegation and how to prepare to delegate. The Key Prerequisites Of Effective Delegation There are a number of essential items you should address before delegating a particular responsibility or task:
  • Delegation Plan – As is the case in many business projects, planning is a key element of success. Therefore, you must have a delegation plan.  This plan should include:
    • What is to be delegated – a clear description of the task or responsibility you are going to delegate
    • Who is this item going to be delegated to – not only who, but you will need to have a clear understanding of why the recipient is the ideal person (or team) to accomplish your goal
    • Definition of Success – have a clear understanding of what your expected result will be, and be able to clearly communicate this definition of success
    • Metrics – know how you are going to measure progress toward success
    • Time frame – is the item to be delegated on-going or finite
    • Follow up – know how often are you going to check on progress toward success
  • The Why – You must have a clear understanding of why you are delegating the item. Your why may include some of the following:
    • You do not have the necessary skills
    • You do not like the task to be delegated
    • Someone on your team (either internal or external) has more experience or professional training
    • The item is not the most effective use of your time and attention
  • The Item Must Be Something That Can Be Delegated – Simply put, if you are the surgeon, you must do the surgery. On the other hand, if you are the surgeon, you will certainly delegate the anesthesia.  It is counterproductive to delegate something that only you can accomplish AND is core to the success of your business
  Preparing To Delegate Not unlike real estate, effective delegation has three very important items you must have in order to delegate:
  1. Communicate the responsibility or task to be delegated – know exactly how you are going to define what you expect
  2. Communicate the definition of success – know exactly how you are going to define and measure success
  3. Communicate the bigger picture – know how you are place the delegated item into the context of the businesses success and mission
Unlike real estate there is a fourth important item you must be prepared to do in order to have effective delegation, not abdication – you MUST be prepared to not take the item back if it is being accomplished but not exactly as you would accomplish it.  As long as it is moving forward, you must be prepared to LET IT GO!